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By contactus@drcindric.com
August 15, 2017
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Contact: Dr. Cherrie Cindric, Dr. Todd Cindric
(724-832-1000, 724-863-0996)

 

Old wives’ tales or myths are fun to laugh at and we may have believed them as children, but there are other myths that are no laughing matter, especially when they involve your health.

Below are five myths about foot care and the realities behind them:

Myth: Cutting a notch (a “V”) in a toenail will relieve the pain of ingrown toenails.
Reality: When a toenail is ingrown, the nail curves downward and grows into the skin. Cutting a “V” in the toenail does not affect its growth. New nail growth will continue to curve downward. Cutting a “V” may actually cause more problems and is painful in many cases.

Myth: My foot or ankle can’t be broken if I can walk on it.
Reality: It’s entirely possible to walk on a foot or ankle with a broken bone. It depends on your threshold for pain, as well as the severity of the injury but it’s not a smart idea. Walking with a broken bone can cause further damage.

It is crucial to stay off an injured foot until diagnosis by a foot and ankle surgeon. Until then, apply ice and elevate the foot to reduce pain.

Myth: Shoes cause bunions.
Reality: Bunions are most often caused by an inherited faulty mechanical structure of the foot. It is not the bunion itself that is inherited, but certain foot types make a person prone to developing a bunion. While wearing shoes that crowd the toes together can, over time, make bunions more painful, shoes themselves do not cause bunions.

Although some treatments can ease the pain of bunions, only surgery can correct the deformity.

Myth: A doctor can’t fix a broken toe.
Reality: Nineteen of the 26 bones in the foot are toe bones.

There are ways make a broken toe heal better and prevent problems later on, like arthritis or toe deformities.

Broken toes that aren’t treated correctly can also make walking and wearing shoes difficult. A foot and ankle surgeon will x-ray the toe to learn more about the fracture. If the broken toe is out of alignment, the surgeon may have to insert a pin, screw or plate to reposition the bone.

Myth: Corns have roots.
Reality: A corn is a small build-up of skin caused by friction. Many corns result from a hammertoe deformity, where the toe knuckle rubs against the shoe. The only way to eliminate these corns is to surgically correct the hammertoe condition.

Unlike a callus, a corn has a central core of hard material. But corns do not have roots. Attempting to cut off a corn or applying medicated corn pads can lead to serious infection or even amputation. A foot and ankle surgeon can safely evaluate and treat corns and the conditions contributing to them.

How can we help you?

The professional staff at Westmoreland Foot & Ankle Care find caring for your podiatric health exceptionally rewarding. If you are experiencing pain, please don't wait. Contact the office right away for an appointment at one of our two offices. In Irwin, call (724) 863-0996. For the Greensburg location, call (724) 832-1000.

By contactus@drcindric.com
August 08, 2017
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Common foot ailments runners should watch for:

Athlete’s Foot: This fungal skin disorder causes dry, cracking skin between the toes, itching, inflammation and blisters. It can be prevented and controlled by washing the feet regularly and carefully drying between the toes; switching running shoes every other day to allow them to dry; wearing socks made with synthetic material instead of cotton; and applying over-the-counter ointments.

Toenail Problems: Ingrown nails can cause inflammation and possible infection and usually are treated by cutting the corner of the nail with sterile clippers. Black toenails happen when a blood blister forms under the nail from trauma, and it’s best to let the nail fall off by itself. Fungal toenails are yellow, brown or black and sometimes are irregularly shaped and thick. They are best treated with oral anti-fungal medications.

Foot Odor: There are more than 250,000 sweat glands in the foot and daily hygiene plus regular changing of shoes and socks are best for controlling sweat and odor. Runners should avoid wearing cotton socks and running without socks. Foot powders, aerosols antiperspirants and vinegar soaks also are helpful.

Blisters, corns and calluses: Never pop blisters unless they are larger than a quarter or are painful or swollen. Use a sterile instrument to lance the corner, leave the top as a biological dressing, wash, apply antibiotic ointment, and cover with a Band-Aid. Corns and calluses are caused by repeated friction, and should be treated by aseptically trimming the dead skin and eliminating the underlying cause.

Contact Dr. Cindric's office in Greensburg at 724-832-1000 or Irwin at 724-863-0996 for more information.

By contactus@drcindric.com
August 02, 2017
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The barrier to a perfect golf swing could lie in your big toe. Or your heel. Or on the ball of your foot. These are the three areas of your feet most likely to cause pain that can ruin your golf swing.  Visit your podiatrists in Irwin and Greenburg, PA, at Westmoreland Foot & Ankle Care to receive the best in podiatric medicine. Dr. Cherrie Cindric and Dr. Todd Cindric get to the root cause of all sorts of foot and ankle pain so patients have their best quality of life.

Behind these pain-prone spots can lie stiff joints, stretched-out tissues and even nerve damage. But pain relief is possible and frequently does not require surgery.

The three most common painful foot conditions that can ruin your golf swing are heel pain, arthritis and pinched nerves.

  • Arthritis can cause pain in the joint of your big toe that makes it difficult to follow-through on your golf swing.
  • Heel pain typically results from an inflammation of the band of tissue that extends from your heel to the ball of your foot. People with this condition compare the pain to someone jabbing a knife in their heel. Heel pain can make it uncomfortable for golfers to maintain a solid stance during crucial portions of their golf swing.
  • Neuromas are nerves that become thickened, enlarged and painful because they’ve been compressed or irritated. A neuroma in the ball of your foot can cause significant pain as your body transfers its weight from one foot to the other in a golf swing.

Several other painful conditions can also cause instability during your swing. Some athletes and former athletes develop chronic ankle instability from previous ankle sprains that failed to heal properly. Motion-limiting arthritis and Achilles tendonitis can also affect your balance. Ill-fitting golf shoes may cause corns and calluses that make standing uncomfortable.

For the majority of golfers and other patients, Dr. Cindric recommends simple treatments such as custom orthotic devices (shoe inserts), stretching exercises, changes to your shoes, medications, braces or steroid injections and physical therapy. However, if these conservative measures fail to provide adequate relief, surgery may be required.

How can we help you?

The professional staff at Westmoreland Foot & Ankle Care find caring for your podiatric health exceptionally rewarding. If you are experiencing pain, please don't wait. Contact the office right away for an appointment at one of our two offices. In Irwin, call (724) 863-0996. For the Greensburg location, call (724) 832-1000.

By Westmoreland Foot & Ankle Care, LLC
July 26, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Ankle Pain  

Ankle pain. Maybe it's not the most publicized chronic health condition, but it's real. It hurts, and it impacts mobility and well-being. As a ankle painmatter of fact, the American Podiatric Medical Association states that more than three-quarters of adults in the US have foot and/or ankle pain, but only a small majority seek education on and treatment their problems. Your podiatrists in Irwin and Greenburg, MA, urge you to come to Westmoreland Foot & Ankle Care so you receive the best in podiatric medicine. Experts in diseases and conditions of the lower extremities, Dr. Cherrie Cindric and Dr. Todd Cindric get to the root cause of all sorts of ankle pain so patients have their best quality of life.

Types of ankle pain

The most frequently occurring ankle pain comes from traumatic injury. Just step off a curb, twist your ankle and suddenly and painfully, it's sprained. The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons say that this injury to the outer aspect of the ankle has a lot in common with chronic or repeated injuries to the ankle, including symptoms such as:

  • Tenderness
  • Swelling
  • Instability of the joint as you walk
  • Scarring

Over time, painful osteoarthritis deteriorates the function and even the form of the ankle.

Other kinds of ankle pain stem from chronic problems such as tarsal tunnel syndrome, which is a nerve injury or nerve pinch that causes substantial burning sensations within the ankle. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, or PTTD, is an overuse injury in which the tendon in the ankle doesn't provide adequate support. Over time, the arches of the foot flatten. Gout, a type of arthritis associated with uric acid build-up and Achilles tendonitis, an inflammation of the large tendon along the back of the leg, round out the painful problems podiatrists in Irwin and Greenburg see.

Treating ankle pain

Your foot doctors at Westmoreland Foot & Ankle Care employ the latest diagnostic techniques to understand ankle pain. CT scans, MRIs, ultrasound imaging and digital X-rays, combined with the podiatrists' experience, create treatment plans which optimize the good aspects of your foot and ankle health and support and treat weaknesses.

For instance, the doctors may prescribe:

  • Physical therapy and stretching exercises
  • Anti-inflammatory medications and cortisone injections
  • Casts and braces
  • Shoe inserts (customized orthotics), splints and padding

How can we help you?

The professional staff at Westmoreland Foot & Ankle Care find caring for your podiatric health exceptionally rewarding. If you have ankle pain, please don't wait. Contact the office right away for an appointment at one of our two offices. In Irwin, call (724) 863-0996. For the Greensburg location, call (724) 832-1000.

By contactus@drcindric.com
July 24, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
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Runners: Fit feet finish faster

Greensburg, Pennsylvania – July, 2017 Both long-distance runners and casual joggers can improve their performance by keeping their feet in top condition and taking steps to control foot problems common in runners, according to a Westmoreland County foot and ankle surgeon.

"The human foot is a biological masterpiece that amazingly endures the stresses of daily activity," says Cherrie Cindric, DPM, FACFAS, a member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). "For runners, the feet are more vulnerable to injury than any other part of the body, and these athletes should be on the alert for signs of foot problems that can slow them down if not treated promptly."

Cindric says the most common complaint from runners is heel pain. This condition, also called plantar fasciitis, is frequently caused by inflammation of the ligament that holds up the arch.

"In athletes, heel pain can result from faulty mechanics and over pronation in which pressure is unequally applied to the inside of the foot. It also can be caused by wearing running shoes that are worn out or too soft," she explains.

At the first sign of heel pain, Cindric recommends runners do stretching exercises, wear sturdier shoes and use arch supports. In some cases, icing and anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, are helpful. Should heel pain continue, custom orthotics, injections and physical therapy might be required.  Surgery normally isn’t considered unless heel pain persists for more than a year and conservative treatment has failed to bring relief.

Neuromas and tendonitis are other common foot problems that affect runners. A neuroma is a pinched nerve between the toes that can cause pain, numbness and a burning sensation in the ball of the foot. Overly flexible shoes often are the cause and padding, orthotics or injections usually are effective. Sometimes surgery is the answer if pain between the toes continues for more than six months.

Serious runners can be sidelined with tendonitis if they ignore the warning signs of this overuse-related condition.

"There are several forms of tendonitis that affect the Achilles and other areas, and all are treated with rest, icing, stretching and anti-inflammatory medications, and sometimes with orthotics and physical therapy." Cindric says. "Over-zealous training usually causes tendonitis, especially among beginners who try to do too much too soon."

A common myth among athletes, according to Cindric, is that it’s not possible to walk or run if a bone in the foot is fractured.

"I often hear surprised patients say ‘It can’t be broken, I can walk on it,’ she says.  "That’s not true, especially with stress fractures when pain and swelling might not occur for a few days."

If a fracture or sprain is suspected, Cindric advises runners to remember the word RICE as an abbreviation for Rest-Ice-Compression-Elevation.

"If pain and swelling continues after following the RICE procedure for three or four days, you should see a foot and ankle surgeon for an x-ray and proper diagnosis."

Contact Cindric's office in Greensburg at 724-832-1000 or Irwin at 724-863-0996 for more information, or visit the ACFAS consumer Web site, FootHealthFacts.org.





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