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Posts for: February, 2011

By contactus
February 21, 2011
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Frequently asked questions about bunion surgery

 

So you are considering bunion surgery, but have heard a lot of rumors about the recovery, pain, and limitations after the procedure. What can you expect?

 

According to Foot and Ankle Surgeons Todd and Cherrie Cindric, DPM, FACFAS, your expectations should vary based on the severity of your condition. It is normal and natural after any surgery to have some pain, but bunion surgery is usually performed under sedation with local anesthetic. When you first wake up from the procedure, you will not have any pain. The local block in your foot will wear off in 6-8 hours, and can be controlled with oral pain medication. The majority of pain can be expected in the first 1-2 days, with significant improvement in symptoms over the following weeks.

 

There are basically three stages of bunion deformities, and this determines the severity of your condition and the nature of your surgical planning. For sake of discussion, we will categorize them as mild, moderate, and severe.

 

A mild bunion is categorized as a small bump on the inside of the foot, with little to no deviation of the toe. After x ray evaluation, there is noted to be minimal deviation of the first metatarsal bone out of its normal position. This can usually be corrected by removing the bump and tightening up the soft tissues. "Most bunions, by the time they are symptomatic, do not fall into this category," explains Dr. Cherrie Cindric. Weight bearing and return to normal activity occurs in 2-4 weeks after surgery, and therapy is usually not needed.

 

A moderate bunion is categorized as a medium sized bump on the inside of the foot, with mild to moderate deviation of the big toe. On x ray evaluation, there is noted to be an increase in the angle between two bones in your forefoot, which means to correct the problem, you need to have a cut made in the bone at the head of the bone for it to be positioned back to its anatomic location. This is held in place with a screw. You can walk on it immediately, but will be limited in this for the first 2 weeks. After that, you can progress to a regular shoe in 2-4 weeks. "The majority of surgically corrected bunions in this office are treated with this very versatile procedure, and have a great outcome," explains Dr. Todd Cindric, DPM, FACFAS.

 

A severe bunion is similar to the moderate bunion, but the correction that is necessary is much more involved. A bone cut needs to be made further back in the bone, or the joint needs to be fused, necessitating cast immobilization with no weight to the foot for 6 weeks to 3 months. Physical therapy is usually required after this for about a month.

 

Please be advised that the above are only guidelines, and that each surgical case is different. Please contact Dr. Cherrie or Dr. Todd Cindric at 724-832-1000 to schedule your consultation.


By contactus
February 21, 2011
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Coming soon.
By contactus
February 21, 2011
Category: Uncategorized
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Don't Ignore Flat Feet!
Study links this condition to painful foot maladies

 

(Greensburg, PA, February 21, 2011) -- -- Treatment and prevention of adult flatfoot can reduce the incidence of additional foot problems such as bunions, hammertoes, arthritis and calluses, and improve a person's overall health, according to research published in the July/August Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery.

Overweight males in white-collar jobs are most apt to suffer from adult flatfoot disorder, a progressive condition characterized by partial or total collapse of the arch, according to the research. FootHealthFacts.org, the consumer website of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, notes that symptoms of adult flatfoot include pain, swelling, flattening of the arch and an inward rolling of the ankle. But because flatfoot is a progressive disorder by nature, the study suggests that neglecting treatment or preventive care can lead to arthritis, loss of function of the foot and other painful foot disorders.

"Flatfoot disorder may gradually worsen to the point that many of the tendons and ligaments in the foot and ankle are simply overworking, often to the point where they tear and/or rupture," says Greensburg foot and ankle surgeon Todd Cindric, DPM, FACFAS.

Flat Foot Study

In many cases, flatfoot can be treated with non-surgical approaches including orthotic devices or bracing, immobilization, physical therapy, medication and shoe modifications. "In some patients whose pain is not adequately relieved by conservative treatments, there are a variety of surgical techniques available to correct flatfoot and improve foot function," Dr. Cindric added.

"As in most progressive foot disorders, early treatment for flatfoot disorder is also the patient's best route for optimal success in controlling symptoms and additional damage to the feet," continued Cindric. "The goal is to keep patients active, healthy and as pain free as possible."

If you suspect you have a flatfoot disorder or have foot discomfort, call Dr. Cindric's office at 724-832-1000 for an evaluation in our Greensburg or Jeannette offices.

For additional information on adult flatfoot or other foot conditions, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeon's health information website at FootHealthFacts.org.


By contactus
February 21, 2011
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Is Your Foot Fracture an Early Sign of Osteoporosis?
Local foot surgeon urges patients not to ignore foot pain

Greensburg, PA 2/21/2011 -- Unexplained foot fractures may be the first sign of osteoporosis, a bone thinning disease which affects over 28 million Americans and accounts for 1.5 million bone fractures a year.

According to Greensburg foot and ankle surgeon Cherrie Cindric, DPM, FACFAS , osteoporosis is frequenty referred to as the "silent crippler" since it often progresses without any symptoms or isn't diagnosed until a person experiences pain from a bone fracture. Dr. Cindric, a member of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, explains that the porous nature of bones in people with osteoporosis makes them more susceptible to bone fractures, especially in the feet. "Because the bones are in a weakened state, normal weight-bearing actions like walking can cause the bones in the foot to break," says Dr. Cindric. "In fact, many patients visit their foot and ankle surgeon suffering from foot pain only to find out they actually have a stress fracture, without having experienced an injury."

While osteoporosis is most commonly seen in women over age 50, younger people and men are also affected. Early symptoms can include increased pain with walking accompanied by redness and swelling on the top of the foot. "Oftentimes patients don't seek treatment for their symptoms for weeks or even months, thinking the pain will pass," says Dr. Cindric. "The best advice is, don't ignore foot pain of any type. Early intervention can make all the difference in your treatment and recovery."

Osteoporosis

Foot and ankle surgeons are able to diagnose osteoporosis through bone densitometry tests, which measure calcium and mineral levels in the bones through low-dose radiation x-ray, or possibly through a routine x-ray. "This is why prevention and early intervention are key; women should make sure bone densitometry tests are part of their wellness examinations when indicated by their physicians," Dr. Cindric explains.

If you are diagnosed with osteoporosis, it's important to protect your feet from stress fractures. Wear shoes that provide support and cushioning, such as athletic running shoes, to provide extra shock absorption and protection. Custom orthotics may also be recommended to protect the foot from pressure and provide shock absorption, particularly during exercise.

If you are suffering from foot pain or suspect you may have osteoporosis, call Dr. Cindric's office at 724-832-1000 for an evaluation.

For more information on osteoporosis of the foot, visit the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons' website, FootHealthFacts.org.